Royal Canadian Mounted Police

2022/23 Annual Report to Parliament on the Administration of the Privacy Act

On this page

  1. List of acronyms and abbreviations
  2. List of charts
  3. List of tables
  4. Introduction
  5. Organizational structure
  6. Delegation Order
  7. Performance for 2022/23
  8. Training and awareness
  9. Policies, guidelines and procedures
  10. Initiatives and projects to improve Access to Information
  11. Summary of key issues and actions taken on complaints or audits
  12. Material privacy breaches
  13. Privacy impact assessments
  14. Public interest disclosures
  15. Monitoring compliance
  16. Appendix A - Delegation Order
  17. Appendix B - Statistical report on the Privacy Act
  18. Appendix C - Supplemental statistical report on the Access to Information Act

List of acronyms and abbreviations

ATIP
Access to Information and Privacy
GBA Plus
Gender-based Analysis Plus
IM/IT
information management / information technology
MOU
memorandum of understanding
RCMP
Royal Canadian Mounted Police

List of charts

List of tables

Introduction

The 2022/23 fiscal year marks the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)’s second year of its five-year modernization plan for its Access to Information and Privacy program. The RCMP is pleased to report some significant improvements to its performance and program overall, and is proud of its ongoing collaboration with our employees across Canada, as well as our network of partnerships with other Government of Canada departments. These improvements are also a testament to the hard work and dedication of the Branch’s employees.

The biggest change to the Branch with the most impact, was the creation of three streams: Operations, Access and Privacy. By dividing the work and allowing employees in each stream to focus on their respective sections/priorities, the Branch as a whole has made important strides in compliance rates and to attract, hire and retain more staff. Employees within each stream can also better tailor their training plans and career goals to match their stream which will contribute to retention – an important goal for the Branch.

Ensuring Canadians have timely access to information so that they understand how and why the RCMP makes decisions and the challenges we face, is key to strengthening their trust in our organization. The RCMP takes these responsibilities seriously, and is committed to meeting the expectations of Canadians while protecting the integrity of the investigations undertaken on their behalf. Canadians are encouraged to monitor our work through the public website.

The RCMP is pleased to outline in this annual report details of the manner in which it discharged its responsibilities in relation to the Privacy Act during the reporting period. The report is prepared and tabled in Parliament in accordance with section 72 of the Privacy Act.

Organizational structure

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

In May of 2023, the RCMP marked 150 years of service as Canada’s national police service. As a federal, provincial, territorial and municipal policing body, it provides federal policing services to all Canadians and policing services under contract to the three territories, eight provinces, and more than 150 communities delivered through more than 700 detachments across Canada, 600 Indigenous communities and three international airports.

The RCMP's mandate is multifaceted and includes: preventing and investigating crime; maintaining peace and order; enforcing laws; contributing to national security; ensuring the safety of state officials, visiting dignitaries and foreign missions; and, providing vital operational support services to other police and law enforcement agencies within Canada and abroad.

A commissioner leads the RCMP and is supported by a Senior Executive Committee made up of regular members and public servants. The role of this committee is to develop, promote and communicate strategic priorities, strategic objectives, management strategies and performance management for the purpose of direction and accountability.

The organization is subdivided into 16 divisions (10 provinces, three territories, National Division, Depot and National Headquarters in Ottawa), each of which is under the direction of a Commanding Officer or Director General.

National Headquarters includes 10 business lines and is structured as follows: Federal Policing, Contract and Indigenous Policing, Specialized Policing Services, Corporate Management and Comptrollership, Human Resources, Internal Audit and Evaluation, Professional Responsibility Sector, Strategic Policy and External Relations, and Legal Services.

Work began in June 2022 on the transformation of Federal Policing, which will see the consolidation of National Division in fiscal year 2023/24. This change fits in with the broader vision for the RCMP and Federal Policing’s modernization efforts. The Federal Policing program will be shifting from the current divisional model to a regional model, whereby the country will be divided up into four Federal Policing regions. In support of regionalization and in light of National Division’s dual mandates, this shift to regionalization will have an impact on the Division in its entirety.

Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Branch

The RCMP established the ATIP Branch in 1983, as the central contact point for matters arising from both the Access to Information Act and Privacy Act. During the reporting period, the ATIP Branch fell within the Strategic Policy and External Relations Directorate.

With modernizing the ATIP program, significant restructuring of the ATIP Branch occurred during the reporting year. A new executive structure was created and is led by a Director General. This position is supported by three directors. Each of these directors leads a specialized team and they include: Access to Information, Privacy, and Operational Support.

The Director General acts on behalf of the head of the institution as the Departmental Access to Information and Privacy Coordinator for the RCMP. The ATIP Coordinator ensures compliance with both the spirit and the intent of the Access to Information Act and Privacy Act, as well as all associated regulations, policies and guidelines. The Director General position is also tasked with leading the program’s broad modernization efforts.

Operational Support stream

Led by a Director, the Operational Support stream is responsible for the opening, clarifying, processing and tasking of incoming requests. It further supports the Branch through the maintenance of the ATIP case management and redaction system/database, data analysis and reports on program performance. This stream also is responsible for overseeing and processing formal Access to Information Act or Privacy Act requests related to the Body Worn Camera initiative or body-worn camera footage contained in operational files.

When tasking requests, the Operational Support stream works closely with divisional Liaison Officers and record holders, known as the Office of Primary Interest. Some responsibilities of the Liaison Officers and Offices of Primary Interest include:

Liaison Officers
Liaison Officers are responsible for forwarding all ATIP requests to the appropriate personnel (that is, Offices of Primary Interest) within their business lines or divisions. Other responsibilities include: tracking submissions to ensure responsive records are sent by Offices of Primary Interest to the ATIP Branch; ensuring responses are on time; and, documenting and communicating internal RCMP ATIP processes to all who facilitate the processing of requests.
Office of Primary Interest
As the record holders, some of the Offices of Primary Interest’s responsibilities include: providing electronic copies of the responsive records; reviewing records for duplication; ensuring that the infor-mation falls within the scope of the request; notifying the ATIP Branch if records are voluminous; and, advising the Branch or Liaison Officer if an extension is required.

As mentioned above, with the introduction of a significant operational change and the division of the ATIP Branch into three specialized streams (Operational Support, Access to Information and Privacy), the Branch has allowed for a more functional streamlined process and better specialized growth opportunities for its analysts. The change also enables greater development for employees new to the ATIP community and for those wishing to continue in this field. Creating the two disclosure streams has allowed analysts to become experts in the specific fields and with the type of records processed in applying the Acts and Regulations. It is also providing for a more consistent approach and stronger relationships with Liaison Officers, Offices of Primary Interest and external stakeholders. To highlight, the RCMP received numerous ATIP requests and consultations related to the Freedom Convoy. With the new streams, the ATIP Branch was able to assign one analyst to review and respond to all convoy related requests. This new approach ensured uniformity to the processing and review of records as the analyst had a thorough knowledge of the previous records processed. This approach ultimately resulted in a quicker turnaround time in processing, reviewing and completing requests.

Access to Information stream

Led by a Director, the Access stream is responsible for responding to all formal requests made under the Access to Information Act. This stream is made up of four disclosure teams, each with an area of expertise. The first team focuses on the on-time requests, helping the RCMP meet its obligations under the Act. The second team specifically looks at the most dated backlog files in order to reduce the risk associated with these dated requests. A new team, made up of highly experienced analysts, has been formed to address sensitive investigations which may require extensive consultations or unique knowledge in order to process. The fourth team is responsible for reviewing and responding to complaints received through the Office of the Information Commissioner.

The Access Stream led the overall coordination of the proactive publication requirements of Bill C-58 for the RCMP and continues to work with sections responsible for producing briefing materials and reports in order to ensure the RCMP meets the legislative requirements.

Privacy stream

Led by a Director, the Privacy stream has two units responsible for processing personal information requests and supporting compliance of the RCMP’s program delivery with the provisions of the Privacy Act and the policies and directives of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Privacy Disclosure Unit
This unit processes all formal requests under the Privacy Act. Currently there are two teams dedicated to the review and processing of requests for personal information. Another team reviews and responds to complaints received through the Office of the Privacy Commissioner.
Privacy Policy Unit

Privacy Policy Unit is divided into two interrelated but distinct teams: Privacy Client Engagement and Outreach team and the Privacy Compliance and Governance team.

These dedicated professionals provide policy advice and expertise to the RCMP on privacy-related issues, including: providing recommendations to conduct privacy impact assessments, supporting in drafting those privacy impact assessments, reviewing RCMP agreements and contracts (for example, memoranda of understanding (MOUs), information sharing agreements, requests for proposal), and assisting with the investigation of privacy breaches and complaints under sections 4-8 of the Privacy Act. In addition, the team reviews and creates internal policies that reflect Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat policy, directives and guidance as well as expectations from the Office of the Information Commissioner and Office of the Privacy Commissioner. The team works to ensure the RCMP is meeting its obligations as described in section 4.2 of Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's Policy on Privacy Protection and the Privacy Act.

Delegation Order

The Departmental ATIP Coordinator has full authority to administer the legislation. A copy of the signed Delegation Order is included in Appendix A. Of note, due to the reorganization of the Branch (see Section 6), this delegation order is being updated to reflect the new operational structure.

Performance for 2022/23

This section provides on overview of the RCMP’s performance with respect to records requested under the Privacy Act for the 2022/23 reporting year. The completed statistical report is found in Appendix B and the supplemental statistical report is found in Appendix C.

The ATIP Branch remained operational during the 2022/23 fiscal year reporting period; there were no significant impacts on ATIP performance attributable to COVID-19. It continued to work closely with its partners and stakeholders in finding solutions and reviewing processes to ensure that it responded to Canadians’ requests in a satisfactory and timely manner. However, it continued to face challenges that resulted in response delays to requests submitted. Despite its legislative responsibilities, certain realities prevented the RCMP from responding on time.

During the reporting period, some delays were attributable to the following:

  • operational requirements that called for RCMP members and employees to be redeployed for instance: natural disasters like wildfires and flooding, significant investigations (Mass Casualty Commission, Freedom Convoy activities, police assistance for pipeline projects), and major events such as the papal visit, to name a few
  • the RCMP still relies heavily on paper-based processes, with records that have not been digitized
  • the extensive search required (more than 750 locations throughout Canada)
  • the lack of experienced ATIP analysts

The RCMP recognizes the importance of complying with legislated timelines. That is why it continues to overhaul its program and address these issues by:

  • devoting resources to improve the timeliness of responses
  • modernizing/streamlining policies and procedures within the program to enhance operational efficiency
  • expanding training and awareness campaigns for RCMP personnel to ensure they understand the obligation to respond within legislated timeframes

Compliance

The ATIP Branch saw an increase in compliance for the number of requests closed within the legislated time frames under the Privacy Act. In the 2022/23 fiscal year, compliance increased to 55% from 46.1% in the previous fiscal year. The increase is due, in part, to modifications in processes within the Branch, resulting in efficiencies, increased efforts in human resources (staffing, training, retention) and the utilization of contractors to complete complex late files in order to address legislative compliance.

Requests received and closed

As noted in the Statistical Report in Appendix B, the RCMP received a total of 4,741 new requests under the Privacy Act in 2022/23. In addition, there were 3,459 requests outstanding from the previous reporting periods for a total of 8,200 requests. Of these, 3,212 requests were completed and 4,988 carried over to the 2023/24 fiscal year.

Privacy requests cover the personal information of requesters in a variety of records, including information on police operational files, such as motor vehicle accidents, and employment files.

As demonstrated below, there has been an increase in the number of requests received compared to the previous reporting period. The number of requests received increased by 10% compared to the previous fiscal year and increased by 12.5% compared to the 2020/21 fiscal year.

The graph also demonstrates that the number of requests closed this reporting period decreased by 21% compared to the previous fiscal year. The decrease can be attributed to realignment of resources mid-year to the formal Privacy Stream, where most of the team’s efforts were focused on compliance, completing complaint files and building capacity (recruitment and training).

Chart 1: Workload

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Workload
Number of requests Fiscal year 2020/21 Fiscal year 2021/22 Fiscal year 2022/23
Received 4,212 4,290 4,741
Outstanding 2,641 3,253 3,459
Completed 3,614 4,081 3,212
Carried over 3,239 3,462 4,988

Completion time and extensions

The ATIP Branch completed 1,079 (34%) requests in 30 days or less. During the reporting period, 678 (21%) requests were completed within 31 to 60 days, 302 (9%) were completed in 61 to 120 days, and 1,153 (36%) were completed in more than 120 days.

Section 15 of the Privacy Act allows institutions to extend the statutory time limits to respond to a request beyond 30 days.

For the requests closed during the 2022/23 reporting period, the RCMP sought a total of 2,527 extensions under section 15(a)(i), which pertains to unreasonable interference with operations.

No extensions under section 15(a)(ii) were taken for consultations.

Chart 2: Completion rate of closed requests

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Completion rate of closed requests
Fiscal year 0 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days More than 120 days
2020/21 727 504 406 1,977
2021/22 1,153 733 326 1,869
2022/23 1,079 678 302 1,153

Disposition of completed requests

Of the 3,212 requests completed in the 2022/23 fiscal year, the dispositions of completed requests were as follows:

  • 1,608 (50%) requests were disclosed in part
  • 870 (27%) requests were abandoned by requesters
  • 308 (9%) requests had no records located
  • 225 (7%) requests were fully disclosed
  • 178 (6%) requests had all material exempted
  • 23 (1%) requests were neither confirmed nor denied
  • 0 (0%) requests had all material excluded

Chart 3: Disposition of completed requests

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Disposition of completed requests
Disposition of requests Total
All disclosed 225
Disclosed in part 1,608
All exempted 178
All excluded 0
No records exist 308
Request abandoned 870
Neither confirmed nor denied 23
Total 3,212

Consultations for other institutions

The number of consultations received and completed over the last three reporting periods has decreased significantly, which could possibly be a result of COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. During the current reporting period, the RCMP completed 62 consultations, totalling 6,234 pages reviewed. Of the 62 completed consultations, 42 were received from other Government of Canada institutions and 20 were received from other organizations.

Chart 4: All consultations received and completed

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All consultations received and completed
Fiscal year Requests received Requests completed
2020/21 108 96
2021/22 64 86
2022/23 61 62

Active outstanding requests from previous reporting periods

At the conclusion of the 2022/23 fiscal year, a total of 4,988 requests were outstanding. Of those outstanding, 29% were carried over within legislated timelines, and 71% were carried over beyond legislated timelines. The fiscal years where the carried over requests were received in are as follows:

  • 2,916 (59%) received in 2022/23
  • 1,280 (26%) received in 2021/22
  • 535 (11%) received in 2020/21
  • 169 (3%) received in 2019/20
  • 71 (1%) received in 2018/19
  • 3 (less than 1%) received in 2017/18
  • 6 (less than 1%) received in 2016/17
  • 8 (less than 1%) received in 2015/16 or earlier

Chart 5: Active outstanding requests from previous reporting periods

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Active outstanding requests from previous reporting periods
Fiscal year open requests were received Open requests that are within legislated timelines as of March 31, 2022 Open requests that are beyond legislated timelines as of March 31, 2022
Received in 2015/16 or earlier - 8
Received in 2016/17 - 6
Received in 2017/18 - 3
Received in 2018/19 - 71
Received in 2019/20 - 169
Received in 2020/21 - 535
Received in 2021/22 1 1,279
Received in 2022/23 843 2,073
Total 844 4,144

Active outstanding complaints from previous reporting period

At the conclusion of the reporting period, a total of 96 complaints were outstanding. The fiscal years where the outstanding complaints were received in are as follows:

  • 52 (54%) received in 2022/23
  • 23 (24%) received in 2021/22
  • 9 (10%) received in 2020/21
  • 5 (5%) received in 2019/20
  • 3 (3%) received in 2018/19
  • 0 (0%) received in 2017/18
  • 4 (4%) received in 2016/17
  • 0 (0%) received in 2015/16 or earlier

Chart 6: Number of open complaints

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Number of open complaints
Fiscal year open complaints were received by institution Number of open complaints
2022/23 52
2021/22 23
2020/21 9
2019/20 5
2018/19 3
2017/18 0
2016/17 4
2015/16 or earlier 0
Total 96

Section 8 of the Privacy Act

In relation to legislative requirements for disclosure of personal information in accordance with Section 8 of the Privacy Act, the ATIP Privacy Policy Unit reviewed 711 pages relating to paragraph 8(2)(f) disclosures, processed 13 paragraph 8(2)(e) disclosures, 41 paragraph 8(2)(m) disclosures and continued to provide advice and guidance on all other Section 8 provisions. Further, in addition to the work of the Privacy Policy Unit highlighted in the specific sections below, the unit continued to support the organization by responding to 185 privacy policy related inquiries.

Training and awareness

Continuous learning is a priority for the RCMP and the ATIP Branch is no exception. ATIP Branch staff are encouraged to seek out relevant courses and other learning opportunities as a means to enhance their knowledge and to improve their skills.

For the 2022/23 reporting year, the ATIP Branch held regular information-sharing sessions where staff discussed files and shared best practices. As new technological tools were introduced to support remote collaboration during the pandemic, the RCMP was able to leverage these tools (particularly videoconferencing) to provide a number of training sessions to employees. In-house training and orientation were provided to new ATIP operational support staff and virtual training was provided to Office of the Information Commissioner investigators on the structure and mandate of the RCMP, the information management team in B Division (Newfoundland and Labrador), the Province of British Columbia’s Information Access Operations Council, and the RCMP Human Source Unit, among others. In total, 11 training sessions were given to 829 employees.

As part of the modernization efforts, the ATIP Branch began the first of a multi-year plan to visit every division in person. These visits will provide an opportunity for the ATIP Branch, along with its partners to enhance communications by meeting directly with record holders to discuss concerns, meet with divisional management to reiterate the importance of compliance with the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act (including getting privacy right), and to offer training sessions to divisional personnel. As part of the divisional visits, the Privacy stream worked with counterparts in Departmental Security and the National Technology Onboarding Program to carry out presentations and awareness sessions, focusing specifically on privacy breaches, data security and the onboarding of new technology. In this reporting period, presentations were organized with National Division (Ottawa), O Division (Ontario) and E Division (British Columbia), reaching over 1,000 employees at all levels, including RCMP senior leaders in the divisions. These visits also served to strengthen the bonds between the ATIP Branch and our divisional Liaison Officers, the benefits of which can be seen on a daily basis. Plans are underway to continue these visits in the coming reporting period.

The ATIP Privacy Policy Unit continued to provide training and presentations to internal partners and offices of primary interest, specifically in relation to privacy breaches and conducting privacy impact assessments. Two presentations were provided on privacy breaches involving 32 participants, and three presentations were provided on conducting privacy impact assessments involving 22 participants. The unit also made efforts to emphasize the importance of privacy to RCMP senior leaders throughout the 2022/23 fiscal year.

For the 2022 Privacy Awareness Week, the Privacy Policy Unit conducted two organization-wide events including a trivia challenge to bolster privacy awareness, and a speaking event on privacy breaches in conjunction with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner. Both events were very successful drawing in 102 participants and 287 participants, respectively.

In an effort to encourage growth and retention in the ATIP Branch, a developmental program was approved and adopted. This program is designed to build new ATIP analysts from the ground up. In such a highly competitive field, it is important to offer employees opportunities to grow and further develop their skills. The professional development program will bring employees from a PM-01 level to a PM-04 as senior analysts.

During the previous reporting period, the ATIP Branch, in conjunction with the RCMP's Learning and Development Unit, created the Access to Information and Privacy Fundamentals online course available to all RCMP employees. In addition to increasing their knowledge of the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act, this course also provides employees with a better understanding of their responsibilities when responding to information requests and best practices when managing personal information. In 2022/23, over 1,200 new RCMP employees successfully completed the course.

ATIP divisional Liaison Officers also provided presentation sessions to their record holders (Offices of Primary Interest). The sessions included an overview of ATIP modernization, employee’s roles and responsibilities and a list of resources. Discussions during the presentation also quelled misunderstandings regarding the process, while reinforcing proper information management. Specifically, J Division (New Brunswick) provided 16 sessions with attendance of almost 150 employees.

Policies, guidelines and procedures

Throughout this reporting period, the ATIP Branch continued to modernize and update internal policies and procedures to ensure alignment with current reporting standards. These changes will continue to be developed and instituted in the 2023/24 reporting period.

During 2022/23, the ATIP Branch accomplished the following:

  • Enhanced internal processes for facilitating the transfer of files within the RCMP, including the creation of national shared drives for classified information
  • Updated the Access to Information, Privacy and Operations teams’ standard operating procedures, which was part of the ATIP Branch’s efforts to formalize internal processes
  • Modified guidelines to address its on-time and backlog files, enabling processing efficiencies
  • Worked with business lines and divisional Liaison Officers to develop guidelines, standards and awareness communiques to further facilitate RCMP ATIP modernization, and implemented new regular by-weekly meetings to resolve challenges as quickly as possible
  • Continued to lead the interdepartmental working group for the development of business continuity plans specifically for ATIP programs, which led to greater information sharing among the participating departments
  • Reviewed employee work arrangements and implemented a hybrid work model for its employees, allowing more flexibility in turns of work-life balance
  • Weekly meetings held with ATIP Branch, RCMP Communications, and Parliamentary Affairs ensured the organization was able to properly brief the Commissioner and Minister’s office should questions arise. The meetings also provided insight to the ATIP Branch of topics that generated media interest and would result in requests
  • Successfully piloted the temporary hiring of employees from across the country who can work remotely, to support the divisions
  • Onboarding remote employees as part of ATIP Branch modernization to increase the pool of ATIP experienced employees outside of the National Capital Region
  • Development of new operational policies for unique types of materials; as an example, a new directive has been approved by ATIP Branch and the Human Source Unit on how to process request containing source information

Our divisional Liaison Officers are also working to establish processes and workflows. Specifically, E Division (British Columbia) is building their team, creating shared proxy accounts for ATIP requests for over 40 units/detachments, leveraging collaboration tools for improved communications and ensuring consistent and streamlined processes while building a stronger governance framework. As well, F Division (Saskatchewan) assisted with the development of privacy notice statements and questionnaires and reviewing MOUs and coaching junior staff.

Additionally, the Privacy Policy Unit completed the following:

  • Continued work on development of standard operating procedures, updated policies and its privacy framework, as well as efforts towards restructuring RCMP personal information banks
  • Completed a review of its policy and guidance documents on privacy impact assessments; the new guidance documents include a detailed privacy impact assessment handbook, a high-level privacy impact assessment guide, and an updated interim privacy impact assessment template
  • Developed internal standard operating procedures on Privacy Impact Assessment Questionnaires in accordance with Treasury Board guidance and directives on privacy
  • Updated internal standard operating procedures relating to privacy breaches and complaints received in relation to Section 4-8 of the Privacy Act. In addition, to ensure the organization is provided with timely and useful advice, the Privacy Policy Unit developed an internal standard operating procedure for responding to inquiries

Initiatives and projects to improve Access to Information

ATIP modernization

In November 2020, the Information Commissioner of Canada released the results of a systemic investigation of the RCMP’s ATIP program, entitled Access at issue: The need for leadership. The report was highly critical of the RCMP’s ATIP program and identified 15 recommendations for improvement. Subsequently, the Minister of Public Safety issued a Direction to the RCMP to action the recommendations of the Office of the Information Commissioner’s review and submit a strategy outlining a way forward to be developed in consultation with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. In response, the RCMP developed a strategy entitled Access Granted: Restoring Trust in the RCMP’s Access to Information Program, supported by an action plan, outlining initiatives to modernize the program.

The RCMP began implementation of the strategy in the previous reporting period and is committed to seeing it through over the course of the next several years. The objective is to increase compliance rates and enhance public transparency. The RCMP posted the strategy, and is providing quarterly updates on the RCMP external website, and we encourage all Canadians to visit the site and monitor our progress at https://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/en/access-information-and-privacy-programs-modernization-strategy.

Over the reporting period, the RCMP continued to make progress in implementing the strategy. While more details can be found on our external website, some key initiatives include:

Ongoing work enhancements
The RCMP continued to engage PricewaterhouseCooper (PwC) to assist with its modernization efforts. During the reporting period, new approaches designed to support culture and business process changes (for example, introduction to new skills and tools for day-to-day work) have been implemented. Branch sustainability plans were also created and are monitored monthly and updated quarterly. A change management plan was also developed that identified new opportunities to promote and push change throughout the RCMP. Stakeholders also provided positive feedback on the modernization efforts.
Restructuring and hiring blitz
As previously noted, the ATIP Branch has begun implementing a significant restructure and reorganization to ensure that it is bringing the necessary resources and leadership to meet its obligations under the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act. The new structure separates the ATIP Branch into three streams: Access to Information (responsible for meeting Access to Information Act obligations); Privacy (responsible for meeting Privacy Act obligations); and, Operational Supports (responsible for providing critical support services for the entire Branch, such as intake, systems maintenance and data reporting and analysis). Each stream is led by a director, with the Branch now reporting to a Director General. These changes are bringing new personnel into the Branch with the ultimate objective of almost doubling its size over the next four years. As part of its continued modernization efforts, the Branch is looking for people from a variety of places in order to meet its staffing needs. Staffing efforts in all areas, including indigenous recruiting, has resulted in growth from approximately 65 employees to almost 90 by the end of the reporting period. The Branch currently receives funding to staff about 118 positions with a projected organizational chart of 137 staff. For the 2023/24 fiscal year, it will focus on staffing all funded positions.
Focusing on training
As part of broader modernization efforts, the ATIP Branch continued to promote the online ATIP Fundamentals training course to personnel, which resulted in a positive enrollment rate. The ATIP Branch also provided presentations to RCMP employees in four different divisions and divisions provided internal training to their Offices of Primary Interest. Additional efforts continue on the development of new training and course offerings for ATIP Branch personnel and the broader organization that will be in place for the next reporting period. In fact, expanding training delivery forms a key part of the Branch’s human resources strategy for ATIP modernization, succession planning, and employee retention.
Sharing best practices
ATIP modernization is underway across the Government of Canada. In order to ensure that the RCMP continues to benefit from the lessons learned and work underway by its partners, and that partners were aware of work underway at the RCMP, the RCMP remains the lead of an interdepartmental working group to exchange best practices and identify areas for collaboration. Some of the topics discussed have included onboarding of new employees, key performance indicators and improved streamlining practices.

Additional efforts include the following:

  • As part of the RCMP’s response to major events such as the Freedom Convoy in Ottawa and the police assistance for pipeline projects in British Columbia, the ATIP Branch assigned key analysts who work directly with the record holders to retrieve relevant records. This provided a consistent and quick response due to their complete and unique knowledge of the records.
  • The ATIP Branch was involved in the implementation of the Mass Casualty Commission’s recommendations following the events in Portapique, Nova Scotia. Advice and guidance were given to ensure the RCMP’s response was more open and transparent from the onset.
  • Technology is fundamental to ATIP’s ability to meet its obligations under the Acts. The Branch is exploring such options including new case management software, the use of automation, and cloud computing to find efficiencies to improve our response times.
  • Money and technology were provided to divisions and Liaison Officers to enhance their ATIP capabilities with the goal of creating divisional ATIP bureaus
  • The ATIP Branch regularly works with the RCMP’s Audit and Evaluation unit to conduct informal reviews of audits/reports prior to their publication
  • Following a Ministerial Directive, the ATIP Branch continues to support the RCMP’s Management Advisory Board by conducting informal reviews prior to the publication of their recommendations which supports internal reform while remaining transparent with the public

During fiscal year 2022/23 the Privacy Policy Unit continued to strengthen its relationship with the newly conceived National Technology Onboarding Program. As part of this relationship building, both units worked together to develop a RASCI Matrix (Responsible, Accountable, Supportive, Consulted, Informed), which clarifies and defines roles and responsibilities when working with RCMP offices of primary interest.

In addition to National Technology Onboarding Program, the Privacy Policy Unit strengthened its relationship with other key internal stakeholders, such as the IM/IT section, GBA Plus Centre of Expertise and the MOU Policy Centre. The Privacy Policy Unit now meets regularly with these partners to share information and expertise, and to ensure there are no gaps relating to privacy for the organization.

Nearing the end of this reporting period, the RCMP joined the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat ATIP Online Management Tools portal. This portal allows applicants to submit their requests under both the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act online, directly to the institution, upload any required supporting documentation, and even receive their release packages online. This move towards digital requests and responses has improved the service ATIP offices have been able to provide to our clients.

As part of the RCMP Vison150 and the ATIP Office's own modernization efforts, there is an extensive privacy and security awareness training strategy under development; including but not limited to:

  • development and sharing of breach and privacy impact assessment management tools
  • executive leadership deck has been created and is now in circulation
  • increase of privacy resources in the Privacy Policy Unit from 3 to 11 since January 2022 with a planned increase to a total of 14 resources to support the RCMP and all things privacy policy related; dedicated Client engagement and outreach team, as well as a Privacy compliance team; all with an effort to increase privacy compliance, education, awareness and support to the RCMP

Summary of key issues and actions taken on complaints or audits

Complaints and investigations

During this reporting period, the RCMP continued to work collaboratively with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner to address complaints as efficiently as possible. As part of the modernization strategy, a team of analysts dedicated specifically to review and respond to complaints received through the Office of the Privacy Commissioner, was created to enable the RCMP to respond more efficiently to complaints.

Clearview AI

In June 2021, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner conditionally resolved, pending implementation of recommendations, their investigation into the RCMP’s use of Clearview AI. Given the extensive work required, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner granted the RCMP until March 31, 2022 to implement all recommendations.

Over the course of fiscal year 2022/23, the Privacy Policy Unit and the National Technology Onboarding Program worked diligently to provide the Office of the Privacy Commissioner’s Compliance Monitoring team with briefings on key updates, which occurred during monthly meetings and submitted all requested documentation to Office of the Privacy Commissioner by their deadline.

On March 30, 2023, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner advised the RCMP that they were satisfied that their recommendations were implemented and closed their file. Moreover, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner applauded the RCMP’s engagement and commitment in addressing the issues highlighted by this complaint and the efforts undertaken to create a more privacy-conscious culture in the organization.

Disclosure complaint – Office of the Coordination of Grievances and Appeals

Following a review of incidents brought forward by an RCMP employee’s experience as an appellant with the Office of Coordination of Grievances and Appeals, the Privacy Policy Unit engaged closely with the Office of Coordination of Grievances and Appeals to address gaps in policy and procedures to ensure that the program was well aligned with the Privacy Act and related Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat policies. As a result, the program committed to improve guidelines on roles and responsibilities in reporting suspected privacy breaches, improve language concerning privacy protection and obligations in the National Guidebook – Grievance Procedures, and revise privacy notices in standard forms and correspondence. This collaborative work serves as an example of how our leadership in bringing privacy awareness to the forefront of the organization has a direct and positive impact on cornerstone programs with complex processes involving personal information.

Informal Engagement on the Emergencies Act

While not a formal complaint, the RCMP, along with other departments, participated in informal engagement with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner concerning the Emergencies Act, which the Office of the Privacy Commissioner expects to publish in Spring 2023.

Section 9 – Statistical report

Section 9 of the Statistical Report, found in Appendix B, provides data on the complaints received and closed. Specifically, for the 2022/23 reporting period, the RCMP received and provided the following under the Privacy Act:

Section 31

The RCMP received 224 Section 31 notices, which represents 7% of all requests closed during the reporting period. The majority of the complaints received related to delays and deemed refusals, which can be attributed to the ongoing RCMP backlog and to the complex and/or voluminous nature of requests. Under this section, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner formally notifies the institution of their intent to investigate a complaint received.

Section 33

The RCMP received 42 Section 33 notices. Under this section, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner requests representations from both the complainant and the institution pursuant to an ongoing complaint investigation.

Section 35

The RCMP received 129 Section 35 notices. Under this section, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner issues a finding report, which may include recommendations, for founded complaints upon the conclusion of the investigation.

Court action

There were four court proceedings actioned with respect to privacy requests processed within fiscal year 2022/23, and one was discontinued/concluded and dismissed in this reporting period.

Material privacy breaches

As Canada’s national police force, the RCMP is trusted to handle and protect the personal information of Canadians with professionalism and integrity, a job it takes very seriously. To safeguard the personal information in its care, the RCMP has strict policies and procedures in place to prevent unauthorized access and disclosure across the organization, however even with these rigorous procedures in place, privacy breaches still occur, often, as a result of human error. With every privacy breach, the RCMP takes steps to improve its processes to ensure that similar incidents do not occur again.

When a privacy breach is detected, the RCMP Access to Information and Privacy Branch follows the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s guidelines to determine the privacy risks and reports all breaches, deemed material, to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

During fiscal year 2022/23, the Privacy Policy Unit received and reviewed 121 possible privacy breach reports of which eight were deemed material and reported to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, 81 were deemed non-material, nine were determined to not be privacy breaches, two were transferred to the originating department for further investigation and 21 are ongoing.

Material privacy breach summaries

  1. An employee of the Kensington Police Service used the Police Reporting and Occurrence System database to run unauthorized checks for two individuals. The affected individuals notified the RCMP after their applications were declined by the Atlantic Police Academy. The Unit reviewed policy on acceptable user practices and the statement of agreement with the employee and preformed audits to determine the usage of the data being accessed.
  2. A briefcase containing five operational case files was stolen from the car of an employee at their residence. These files concern active criminal investigations of serious offences where forensic analysis was required. In order to prevent a recurrence, it was recommended that the Unit management review security and information management practices regarding hardcopy material transported or used outside of RCMP secure offices with every employee. As well as ensuring all employees working from home have a valid telework agreement in place and have taken steps to assure a safe and appropriate workspace in their homes. A review of program directives and protocols regarding protection of personal information to assure they are aligned with privacy legislation and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s policies was also done. Affected individuals were notified of the privacy breach.
  3. An unencrypted USB containing sensitive operational and personal information was lost by an RCMP member and then found by an unknown individual who made and disseminated copies of it. Due to the nature of the contents of the USB key, there were a total of 1,741 individuals whose personal information was involved by the breach. 616 people were notified of the privacy breach either by letter, by phone or in person depending on the level of risk and sensitivity of the information and some safety measures were implemented for certain individuals. All detachment membership to be re-educated on policies pertaining to the handling of protected information.
  4. USB key lost in public area containing disclosure file to Crown pertaining to an investigation and confidential informant. Recommendation for an internal review of the policies and procedures surrounding the handling of sensitive investigative material and methods of delivery to the Prosecution or any external partners involved as recommended to the unit. Affected individuals were notified of the privacy breach.
  5. An unencrypted USB containing information about a homicide investigation was lost by a member and has not been recovered. Notifications to the affected individuals were made. Recommendation to implement the use of encrypted USB keys as well as recommend an internal review of the policies and procedures surrounding the handling of sensitive investigative material and methods of delivery to the investigational counterparts was suggested to the unit.
  6. Lost USB key containing RCMP member annual assessments of employees and former employees was lost at the Central Alberta District Headquarters Office. The entire district office was then searched by all employees with each workstation, laptop bag and file being search. The USB has not been located and USB devices are no longer used within the Central Alberta District office to store or transfer this type of information. Some of the affected individuals have been notified.
  7. Unauthorised audio tape recording on a personal device of an April 28 2020 meeting between the RCMP Commissioner and H Division (Nova Scotia) Communications and other Senior Officials. The employees at the meeting were not informed of the audio recording. RCMP’s Management team was made aware of the recording in July of 2022 during one of the Mass Casualty Commission witness testimonies where an RCMP employee stated that a recording was made, but was no longer available. A Public Interest Disclosure related to the recording was made in July informing the public that the employee’s actions were under investigations. Affected individuals were informed of the privacy breach.
  8. An RCMP member's name was mistakenly released in an ATIP request release package in connection with his code of conduct investigation. The affected individual has been notified and the unintended recipient has returned the release package and a new release package was resent to the requester.

The unit is continuing to provide training to all employees, a discussion has also been had with Team leaders and contractors discussing the importance of disclosure processes and policies.

Privacy impact assessments

During the reporting period, the RCMP completed three privacy impact assessments. Privacy impact assessments for the Independent Centre for Harassment Resolution, Babel X Platform, and Canadian Firearms Program Online Possession and Acquisition License Minimum Viable Product.

Three new privacy impact assessments were submitted to the ATIP Branch during the reporting period. In addition, three privacy impact assessments were carried forward from the fiscal year 2021/22. All six privacy impact assessments received an initial review by the Privacy Policy Unit . Additionally, the Privacy Policy Unit reviewed 69 privacy impact assessment questionnaires to determine the need for a privacy impact assessment, 10 Treasury Board Submissions, three Memoranda to Cabinet, two statements of work/requests for proposal to ensure privacy requirements are included in contracts, and 27 Memoranda of Understanding.

The ATIP Policy Unit engaged in two consultation sessions with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner. The first consultation session was regarding the Covert Access and Intercept Team and their work towards a program-level privacy impact assessment, which will cover the RCMP’s use of on-device investigative techniques. The ATIP Policy Unit continues to work with the Covert Access and Intercept Team on their privacy impact assessment, and expects that it will be submitted to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner by the summer 2023. The second consultation session with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner involved an MOU to share information with the Law Society of Ontario regarding alleged attorney misconduct found in the course of an investigation.

In addition to consultation meetings, the ATIP Policy Unit continues to meet with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner to provide updates on key files on a bi-monthly basis.

Independent Centre for Harassment Resolution

During the reporting period, the RCMP completed a privacy impact assessment on the Independent Centre for Harassment Resolution. The Independent Centre for Harassment Resolution was launched to implement the RCMP’s new work place harassment and violence prevention and resolution regime in light of the changes to the Canada Labour Code Work Place Harassment and Violence Prevention Regulations. The Independent Centre for Harassment Resolution is a centralized, independent unit responsible for matters relating to the resolution of work place harassment and violence occurrences for RCMP employees. The Independent Centre for Harassment Resolution handles the intake and processing of complaints, case analysis, informal resolution and investigation referrals, as well as monitoring of the work place restoration measures.

Additional information is included in the Executive Summary published here: Independent Centre for Harassment Resolution

Babel X Platform

The RCMP completed a privacy impact assessment on its use of the Babel X platform and submitted this privacy impact assessment to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner. The Babel X platform allows users to locate and isolate publicly available information from social media sites, blogs, forums, news, and other on-line channels. Through this privacy impact assessment the RCMP describes and documents the safeguards in place to protect privacy when collecting open source information using this tool. Based on its assessment, privacy impacts associated with the collection, use, disclosure and retention of open-source information by the RCMP from social media and other internet sites using the Babel X platform are expected to be moderate. Recommendations from the privacy impact assessment process, once fully adopted, are expected to reduce those risks to a low (or acceptable) level.

Additional information is included in the Executive Summary published here: Babel X platform

Possession and Acquisition License Minimum Viable Product MVP

The RCMP’s Canadian Firearms Program completed a privacy impact assessment for the online submission of new Possession and Acquisition License. This project is part of the modernization of the Canadian Firearms Program's business practices to significantly reduce paper—based processes and improve service delivery with the development of digital solutions. The Program adopted a privacy by design approach which permitted the integration of privacy engagements throughout the development and design of the solution. The privacy impact assessment identified four low to medium risks. The Canadian Firearms Program committed to addressing outstanding risks by the end of fiscal year 2022/23 at the latest.

Additional information is included in the Executive Summary published here: Canadian Firearms Digital Services Solution – phase 1 – online Possession and Acquisition Licence portal Privacy Impact Assessment

Public interest disclosures

During the 2022/23 fiscal year, 42 disclosures were made pursuant to paragraph 8(2)(m) of the Privacy Act. The majority of disclosures were related to the duty status of charged RCMP members and the release of dangerous offenders into communities across Canada. However, in two cases disclosures were made relating to exceptional circumstances. In those two cases, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner was notified in advance and in all other cases, the notifications were made after the fact.

Monitoring compliance

The ATIP Branch monitors compliance through weekly and monthly statistical reports, which include the compliance rate, the number of files completed on time and those that are delayed, as well as complaints both received and closed. New for this reporting period is the monthly and quarterly reporting of number of privacy impact assessments and material breaches received by the ATIP Office and subsequently submitted to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner. Performance Dashboards are also key tools to further identify trends and assist the ATIP Branch in strategically developing efficiencies. The Branch’s management team reviews the weekly and monthly reports to manage workload and to determine any upcoming issues where processes could be improved. The reports and dashboards are provided to the RCMP’s Strategic Policy and External Relations Officer and the Commissioner in an effort to improve accountability.

The ATIP Branch continues work on bolstering its data reporting function by onboarding new technology and processes. This new technology will enable the ATIP Branch to be more strategic and transparent, by automatically capturing pertinent data to assist with its planning and public reporting as well as to identify areas where efficiencies may be found.

In addition, the Privacy Policy Unit helps ensure appropriate privacy protections are included in contracts, agreements and arrangement for the organization when they involve the collection, use or disclosure of personal information. The unit works closely with the MOU Policy Centre, which is responsible for supporting and monitoring these documents, to ensure privacy is taken into consideration in the development of these products. In addition, the unit has taken the new obligations set out in section 4.2.26 of the Directive on Privacy Practices seriously, and has begun to develop processes for ensuring compliance with the new reporting requirements.

Appendix A – Delegation Order

Access to Information Act and Privacy Act Delegation Order

The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, pursuant to section 73 of the Access to Information Act and of the Privacy Act, hereby designates the persons holding the position set out in the schedule hereto, or the persons occupying on an acting basis those positions, to exercise the powers and functions of the Minister as the head of a government institution, that is, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, under the section of the Act set out in the Schedule opposite each position. This designation replaces and nullifies all such designations previously signed and dated by the Minister.

Table 1: Schedule
Position Privacy Act and regulations Access to Information Act and Regulations
Commissioner of the RCMP Full Authority Full Authority
Chief, Strategic Policy and Planning Officer
Departmental Access to Information and Privacy Coordinator
Commanding Officers Authority for 8(2)(j) and 8(2)(m) N/A
Officer in Charge, Policy, Processing and External Relations Full Authority except 8(2)(j) and 8(2)(m) 7, 8(1), 9, 11(2) to 11(6) (inclusive), 12(2) and all mandatory exemptions (13(1), 16(3), 19(1), 20(1) and 24(1)) and 6(1) and 8 of the Regulations
Manager, Processing and Triage
Manager, Quality Control
Non-Commissioned Officers and public servants in charge of ATIP unit
Non-Commissioned Officers and public servants in charge of ATIP Branch (analysts) 14 and 15 for all records; 17(2)(b), 19 to 28 (inclusive) for all employee records as designated in InfoSource; For all other records requiring mandatory exemptions in their entirety (19(1), 22(2) and 26) of the Act; 9 and 11(2) of the Regulations 7, 8(1) and 12(2)(b) and all records exempted in their entirety by mandatory exemptions (13(1), 16(3), 19(1), 20(1) and 24(1)) of the Act; 6(1) and 8 of the Regulations

Signed, at the City of Ottawa, this 4 day of December, 2015

The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Appendix B - Statistical Report on the Privacy Act

Name of institution
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Reporting period
2022-04-01 to 2023-03-31

Section 1: Requests under the Privacy Act

1.1 Number of requests received

Table 2: Number of requests received
Number of requests
Received during reporting period 4,741

Outstanding from previous reporting periods

  • Outstanding from previous reporting period: 2,197
  • Outstanding from more than one reporting period: 1,262
3,459
Total 8,200
Closed during reporting period 3,212

Carried over to next reporting period

  • Carried over within legislated timeline: 844
  • Carried over beyond legislated timeline: 4,144
4,988

1.2 Channels of requests

Table 3: Channels of requests
Source Number of requests
Online 3,247
Email 1,001
Mail 488
In person 0
Phone 0
Fax 5
Total 4,741

Section 2: Informal requests

2.1 Number of informal requests

Table 4: Number of informal requests
Number of requests
Received during reporting period 15

Outstanding from previous reporting periods

  • Outstanding from previous reporting period: 1
  • Outstanding from more than one reporting period: 0
1
Total 16
Closed during reporting period 6
Carried over to next reporting period 10

2.2 Channels of informal requests

Table 5: Channels of informal requests
Source Number of requests
Online 1
Email 14
Mail 0
In person 0
Phone 0
Fax 0
Total 15

2.3 Completion time of informal requests

Table 6: Completion time of informal requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
2 0 2 2 0 0 0 6

2.4 Pages released informally

Table 7: Pages released informally
Fewer than 100 pages released 101 to 500 pages released 501 to 1000 pages released 1,001 to 5,000 pages released More than 5,000 pages released
Number of requests Pages released Number of requests Pages released Number of requests Pages released Number of requests Pages released Number of requests Pages released
6 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Section 3: Requests closed during the reporting period

3.1 Disposition and completion time

Table 8: Disposition and completion time
Disposition of requests Completion time
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
All disclosed 8 27 60 28 18 27 57 225
Disclosed in part 69 172 498 195 100 187 387 1,608
All exempted 24 44 54 17 9 13 17 178
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 20 22 32 32 42 54 106 308
Request abandoned 652 38 32 27 16 15 90 870
Neither confirmed nor denied 2 1 2 3 5 2 8 23
Total 775 304 678 302 190 298 665 3,212

3.2 Exemptions

Table 9: Exemptions
Section Number of requests
18(2) 0
19(1)(a) 7
19(1)(b) 3
19(1)(c) 197
19(1)(d) 51
19(1)(e) 1
19(1)(f) 0
20 0
21 1
22(1)(a)(i) 526
22(1)(a)(ii) 269
22(1)(a)(iii) 0
22(1)(b) 331
22(1)(c) 8
22(2) 0
22.1 0
22.2 0
22.3 0
22.4 0
23(a) 0
23(b) 0
24(a) 0
24(b) 0
25 0
26 1 254
27 48
27.1 0
28 4

3.3 Exclusions

Table 10: Exclusions
Section Number of requests
69(1)(a) 0
69(1)(b) 0
69.1 0
70(1) 0
70(1)(a) 0
70(1)(b) 0
70(1)(c) 0
70(1)(d) 0
70(1)(e) 0
70(1)(f) 0
70.1 0

3.4 Format of information released

Table 11: Format of information released
Paper Electronic Other
E-record Data set Video Audio
203 1,627 0 19 62 0

3.5 Complexity

3.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed for paper and e-record formats
Table 12: Relevant pages processed and disclosed for paper and e-record formats
Number of pages processed Number of pages disclosed Number of requests
284,890 123,957 2,904
3.5.2 Relevant pages processed by request disposition for paper and e-record formats by size of requests
Table 13: Relevant pages processed by request disposition for paper and e-record formats by size of requests
Disposition Fewer than 100 pages processed 100 to 500 pages processed 501 to 1,000 pages processed 1,001 to 5,000 pages processed More than 5,000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages processed Number of requests Pages processed Number of requests Pages processed Number of requests Pages processed Number of requests Pages processed
All disclosed 214 2,230 9 2,351 1 784 1 1,297 0 0
Disclosed in part 1,264 29,069 249 60,470 37 26,212 53 97,885 5 52,353
All exempted 150 3,455 26 4,914 1 575 1 1,019 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 862 638 7 1,131 1 507 0 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 2,513 35,392 291 68,866 40 28,078 55 100,201 5 52,353
3.5.3 Relevant minutes processed and disclosed for audio formats
Table 14: Relevant minutes processed and disclosed for audio formats
Number of minutes processed Number of minutes disclosed Number of requests
43,443 830 202
3.5.4 Relevant minutes processed per request disposition for audio formats by size of requests
Table 15: Relevant minutes processed per request disposition for audio formats by size of requests
Disposition Less than 60 minutes processed 60 to 120 minutes processed More than 120 minutes processed
Number of requests Minutes processed Number of requests Minutes processed Number of requests Minutes processed
All disclosed 5 120 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 189 42,685 5 352 0 0
All exempted 3 286 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 197 43,091 5 352 0 0
3.5.5 Relevant minutes processed and disclosed for video formats
Table 16: Relevant minutes processed and disclosed for video formats
Number of minutes processed Number of minutes disclosed Number of requests
15,767 621 91
3.5.6 Relevant minutes processed per request disposition for video formats by size of requests
Table 17: Relevant minutes processed per request disposition for video formats by size of requests
Disposition Less than 60 minutes processed 60 to 120 minutes processed More than 120 minutes processed
Number of requests Minutes processed Number of requests Minutes processed Number of requests Minutes processed
All disclosed 1 9 1 61 0 0
Disclosed in part 57 1,512 10 853 20 13,238
All exempted 1 1 1 93 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 59 1,522 12 1,007 20 13,238
3.5.7 Other complexities
Table 18: Other complexities
Disposition Consultation required Legal advice sought Interwoven information Other Total
All disclosed 0 0 0 87 87
Disclosed in part 19 0 3 812 834
All exempted 0 0 0 32 32
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 136 136
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 14 14
Total 19 0 3 1,081 1,103

3.6 Closed requests

3.6.1 Number of requests closed within legislated timelines
Table 19: Number of requests closed within legislated timelines
Number of requests closed within legislated timelines 1,769
Percentage of requests closed within legislated timelines (%) 55.0747198

3.7 Deemed refusals

3.7.1 Reasons for not meeting legislated timelines
Table 20: Reasons for not meeting legislated timelines
Number of requests closed past the legislated timelines Principal reason
Interference with operations or workload External consultation Internal consultation Other
1,443 1,443 0 0 0
3.7.2 Request closed beyond legislated timelines (including any extension taken)
Table 21: Requests closed beyond legislated timelines (including any extension taken)
Number of days past legislated timelines Number of requests past legislated timeline where no extension was taken Number of requests past legislated timeline where an extension was taken Total
1 to 15 days 10 77 87
16 to 30 days 10 65 75
31 to 60 days 10 119 129
61 to 120 days 9 178 187
121 to 180 days 4 110 114
181 to 365 days 10 256 266
More than 365 days 30 555 585
Total 83 1,360 1,443

3.8 Requests for translation

Table 22: Requests for translation
Translation requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

Section 4: Disclosures under Subsections 8(2) and 8(5)

Table 23: Disclosures under Subsections 8(2) and 8(5)
Paragraph 8(2)(e) Paragraph 8(2)(m) Subsection 8(5) Total
13 41 41 95

Section 5: Requests for correction of personal information and notations

Table 24: Requests for correction of personal information and notations
Disposition for correction requests received Number
Notations attached 3
Requests for correction accepted 0
Total 3

Section 6: Extensions

6.1 Reasons for extensions

Table 25: Reasons for extensions
Number of extensions taken 15(a)(i) Interference with operations 15(a)(ii) Consultation 15(b) Translation purposes or conversion
Further review required to determine exemptions Large volume of pages Large volume of requests Documents are difficult to obtain Cabinet Confidence Section (Section 70) External Internal
2,527 0 0 2,527 0 0 0 0 0

6.2 Length of extensions

Table 26: Length of extensions
Length of extensions 15(a)(i) Interference with operations 15(a)(ii) Consultation 15(b) Translation purposes or conversion
Further review required to determine exemptions Large volume of pages Large volume of requests Documents are difficult to obtain Cabinet Confidence Section (Section 70) External Internal
1 to 15 days 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 0 0 2,527 0 0 0 0 0
31 days or greater 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 2,527 0 0 0 0 0

Section 7: Consultations received from other institutions and organizations

7.1 Consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions and other organizations

Table 27: Consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions and other organizations
Consultations Other Government of Canada institutions Number of pages to review Other organizations Number of pages to review
Received during the reporting period 42 6,550 19 1,209
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 5 580 5 222
Total 47 7,130 24 1,431
Closed during the reporting period 42 5,169 20 1,065
Carried over within negotiated timelines 3 475 2 47
Carried over beyond negotiated timelines 2 1,486 2 319

7.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions

Table 28: Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests Total
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days
Disclose entirely 10 9 5 4 1 0 0 29
Disclose in part 1 4 2 1 0 1 1 10
Exempt entirely 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 3
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 13 13 8 5 1 1 1 42

7.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations outside the Government of Canada

Table 29: Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations outside the Government of Canada
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests Total
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days
Disclose entirely 6 3 3 1 0 0 0 13
Disclose in part 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 5
Exempt entirely 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 7 5 4 3 0 1 0 20

Section 8: Completion time of consultations on Cabinet Confidences

8.1 Requests with Legal Services

Table 30: Requests with Legal Services
Number of days Fewer than 100 pages processed 100 to 500 pages processed 501 to 1,000 pages processed 1,001 to 5,000 pages processed More than 5,000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

8.2 Requests with Privy Council Office

Table 31: Requests with Privy Council Office
Number of days Fewer than 100 pages processed 100 to 500 pages processed 501 to 1,000 pages processed 1,001 to 5,000 pages processed More than 5,000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Section 9: Complaints and investigations notices received

Table 32: Complaints and investigations notices received
Section 31 Section 33 Section 35 Court action Total
224 42 129 4 399

Section 10: Privacy impact assessments and personal information banks

10.1 Privacy impact assessments

Table 33: Privacy impact assessments
Number of privacy impact assessments completed 3
Number of privacy impact assessments modified 0

10.2 Institution-specific and central personal information banks

Table 34: Institution-specific and central personal information banks
Personal Information Banks Active Created Terminated Modified
Institution-specific 38 0 0 0
Central 0 0 0 0
Total 38 0 0 0

Section 11: Privacy breaches

11.1 Material privacy breaches reported

Table 35: Material privacy breaches reported
Number of material privacy breaches reported to Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat 8
Number of material privacy breaches reported to Office of the Privacy Commissioner 8

11.2 Non-material privacy breaches

Table 36: Non-material privacy breaches
Number of non-material privacy breaches 81

Section 12: Resources related to the Privacy Act

12.1 Allocated costs

Table 37: Allocated costs
Expeditures Amount
Salaries $2,580,597
Overtime $76,255

Goods and services

  • Professional services contracts: $1,085,754
  • Other: $290,311
$1,376,065
Total $4,032,917

12.2 Human resources

Table 38: Human resources
Resources Person years dedicated to privacy activities
Full-time employees 31.668
Part-time and casual employees 0.336
Regional staff 0.000
Consultants and agency personnel 3.834
Students 0.070
Total 35.908
Note: Enter values to three decimal places.

Appendix C - Supplemental Statistical Report on the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act

Name of institution
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Reporting period
2022-04-01 to 2023-03-31

Section 1: Capacity to receive requests under the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act

Table 39: Enter the number of weeks your institution was able to receive ATIP requests through the different channels
Channel Number of weeks
Able to receive requests by mail 52
Able to receive requests by email 52
Able to receive requests through the digital request service 52

Section 2: Capacity to process records under the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act

2.1 Enter the number of weeks your institution was able to process paper records in different levels

Table 40: Enter the number of weeks your institution was able to process paper records in different levels
Classification level No capacity Partial capacity Full capacity Total
Unclassified paper records 0 0 52 52
Protected B paper records 0 0 52 52
Secret and Top Secret paper records 0 43 9 52

2.2 Enter the number of weeks your institution was able to process electronic records in different classification levels

Table 41: Enter the number of weeks your institution was able to process electronic records in different classification levels
Classification level No capacity Partial capacity Full capacity Total
Unclassified electronic records 0 0 52 52
Protected B electronic records 0 0 52 52
Secret and Top Secret electronic records 0 43 9 52

Section 3: Open requests and complaints under the Access to Information Act

3.1 Enter the number of open requests that are outstanding from previous reporting periods

Table 42: Enter the number of open requests that are outstanding from previous reporting periods
Fiscal year open requests were received Open requests that are within legislated timelines as of March 31, 2023 Open requests that are beyond legislated timelines as of March 31, 2023 Total
Received in 2022/23 714 2,011 2,725
Received in 2021/22 0 1,563 1,563
Received in 2020/21 0 1,064 1,064
Received in 2019/20 0 331 331
Received in 2018/19 0 212 212
Received in 2017/18 0 119 119
Received in 2016/17 0 31 31
Received in 2015/16 0 2 2
Received in 2014/15 0 1 1
Received in 2013/14 or earlier 0 0 0
Total 714 5,334 6,048

3.2 Enter the number of open complaints with the Information Commissioner of Canada that are outstanding from previous reporting periods

Table 43: Enter the number of open complaints with the Information Commissioner of Canada that are outstanding from previous reporting periods
Fiscal year open complaints were received by institution Number of open complaints
Received in 2022/23 189
Received in 2021/22 74
Received in 2020/21 6
Received in 2019/20 18
Received in 2018/19 2
Received in 2017/18 0
Received in 2016/17 0
Received in 2015/16 0
Received in 2014/15 1
Received in 2013/14 or earlier 0
Total 290

Section 4: Open requests and complaints under the Privacy Act

4.1 Enter the number of open requests that are outstanding from previous reporting periods

Table 44: Enter the number of open requests that are outstanding from previous reporting periods
Fiscal year open requests were received Open requests that are within legislated timelines as of March 31, 2023 Open requests that are beyond legislated timelines as of March 31, 2023 Total
Received in 2022/23 843 2,073 2,916
Received in 2021/22 1 1,279 1,280
Received in 2020/21 0 535 535
Received in 2019/20 0 169 169
Received in 2018/19 0 71 71
Received in 2017/18 0 3 3
Received in 2016/17 0 6 6
Received in 2015/16 0 7 7
Received in 2014/15 0 1 1
Received in 2013/14 or earlier 0 0 0
Total 844 4,144 4,988

4.2 Enter the number of open complaints with the Privacy Commissioner of Canada that are outstanding from previous reporting periods

Table 45: Enter the number of open complaints with the Privacy Commissioner of Canada that are outstanding from previous reporting periods
Fiscal year open complaints were received by institution Number of open complaints
Received in 2022/23 52
Received in 2021/22 23
Received in 2020/21 9
Received in 2019/20 5
Received in 2018/19 3
Received in 2017/18 0
Received in 2016/17 4
Received in 2015/16 0
Received in 2014/15 0
Received in 2013/14 or earlier 0
Total 96

Section 5: Social insurance number

Table 46: Has your institution begun a new collection or a new consistent use of the social insurance number in 2022/23?
Has your institution begun a new collection or a new consistent use of the social insurance number in 2022/23? No

Section 6: Universal access under the Privacy Act

Table 47: How many requests were received from confirmed foreign nationals outside of Canada in 2022/23?
How many requests were received from confirmed foreign nationals outside of Canada in 2022/23? 42
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